alternative medicine, bone broth, columbia gorge, health, hood river midwife, hood river naturopath, nutrition, paleo, pdx, pnw, portland, primal, wellness

Portland Gets Its First Dedicated Bone Broth Bar

bone-broth_vyg6haIt was only a matter of time. Portland will soon be home to Broth Bar—located on NE Sixth and Couch next door to Ristretto Roasters—showcasing bone broth from grass-fed and pasture-raised animals.

Packed with easily digestible minerals and gut-healing gelatin, bone broth has been a nutritional darling for years, slowly working its way from the fringes to full-on trend status alongside green smoothies, hot yoga, and organic apothecaries. Popularized by proponents of the paleo diet, ancestral health movements, and food-as-medicine folks, it’s hard to open a magazine or scan a health blog without the buzzy broth popping up. Broth windows, food trucks, and cafés have been popping up in New York, Los Angeles, and Vancouver, BC. Several local restaurants have also jumped on the trend, including Noraneko, Lincoln, and JoLa Café—but Broth Bar will be the first Portland destination to focus first and foremost on the nutritional powerhouse.

What’s more, the idea may capture the healthy food zeitgeist, but the bar is the brainchild of Portland’s own bone broth pioneer, Tressa Yellig of Salt, Fire & Time, who brought retail bone broth to Portland in 2009. Long before broth became the “It Ingredient” of celebrity detoxes, Yellig was crafting healing, small-batch broths from pasture-raised, hormone-free bones sourced from local ranchers, and has earned a loyal following of fans who credit her products with restoring health during and after cancer treatments and other major health crises.

The small-but-mighty 800-square-foot Broth Bar will feature a rotating selection of bone broths—including chicken, beef, turkey, lamb, pork, and bison—with optional add-in “bundles” to turn a mug of broth into a meal, from seasonal kraut and kelp noodles to chickpea miso, grated turmeric, ginger, and soft boiled eggs. A self-serve condiment bar will take the customization even farther, with a dash of tamari, Hot Mama hot sauce, housemade seaweed gomasio, and a variety of salts.

In addition to the main event in a mug, the bright and cheery bar will offer four varieties of Salt, Fire & Time’s kombucha on tap, grab-and-go “picnic-style” fare, and a micro-market stocking hard-to-find supplements, high-quality butter, artisan ingredients, and seasonal produce from local farms.

Broth Bar is set to open in late June, and Yellig—along with sister and business partner Katie Yellig—hopes to host small classes, tastings, cookbook signings, healing food pop-ups, and weekly hamburger nights (featuring Salt, Fire & Time’s organ burgers and fermented condiments).

With the expansion, Yellig wants fans of the brand to have no doubt about the company’s continued dedication to impeccable sourcing of bones, add-ins, and market products. “We want people to never doubt the quality of the ingredients,” says Yellig. “We’re not compromising about how we source, and that will never change.” So grab a mug, get ready, and stay tuned for more details.

Broth Bar
115 NE Sixth, off of NE Couch

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cultivate, express, happiness, hood river midwife, hood river naturopath, journal, mental health, naturopath, write

Keep a One-Sentence Journal, Be Happier

UnknownEver since I can remember, my grandma has kept a daily journal. Not a “Dear Diary,” emotion-filled journal — just a couple of lines jotting down what she did that day and whom she was with. Often, when the family is together, she’ll dig out one of her old journals and tell us what she and various other family members were doing on a random day, in, say, 1994. I’ve always been amazed at how interesting these little moments are in retrospect.So this morning, as I listened to the newest episode of Gretchen Rubin’s “Happier” podcast, I was intrigued to hear her urge her listeners to adopt the habit my grandma has been following for years. Rubin calls it a one-sentence journal, and she herself has kept one for nearly a decade now. On her show, she talked about how she believes that reliving those daily moments has helped make her happier.

There’s even some research backing up Rubin (and my grandma) on this: Last year, Ting Zhang at Harvard Business School published a paper in Psychological Science outlining a series of experiments testing how much people appreciate memories of the day-to-day moments from their lives. She asked people, for example, to write about a recent conversation, and then to rate whether the chat was ordinary or extraordinary; they then guessed how much they’d appreciate reading their written account of the chat in the future.

Seven months later, Zhang contacted participants, asked them to read the memory they’d written down, and then to tell her how much they enjoyed it. Not only did most participants enjoy rediscovering the written record of the months-old conversation more than they’d anticipated, but those who’d written about an ordinary conversation were particularly likely to underestimate how much they’d appreciate reliving the memory.

What seems like an ordinary moment today, in other words, could become a little more special with time. As one participant in Zhang’s study said, “Re-reading this event of doing mundane stuff with my daughter has certainly brightened my day. I’m glad I chose that event to write about because of the incredible joy it gives me at this moment.”

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alternative medicine, columbia gorge, homeopathy, hood river midwife, hood river naturopath

FDA Ponders Putting Homeopathy To A Tougher Test

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Katherine Streeter for NPR

It’s another busy morning at Dr. Anthony Aurigemma’s homeopathy practice in Bethesda, Md.

Wendy Resnick, 58, is here because she’s suffering from a nasty bout of laryngitis. “I don’t feel great,” she says. “I don’t feel myself.”

Resnick, who lives in Millersville, Md., has been seeing Aurigemma for years for a variety of health problems, including ankle and knee injuries and back problems. “I don’t know what I would do without him,” she says. “The traditional treatments just weren’t helping me at all.”

Aurigemma listens to Resnick’s lungs, checks her throat and then asks detailed questions about her symptoms and other things as well, such as whether she’s been having any unusual cravings for food.

Aurigemma went to medical school and practiced as a regular doctor before switching to homeopathy more than 30 years ago. He says he got disillusioned by mainstream medicine because of the side effects caused by many drugs. “I don’t reject conventional medicine. I use it when I have to,” Aurigemma says.

Throughout his career, homeopathy has been regulated differently from mainstream medicine.

In 1988, the Food and Drug Administration decided not to require homeopathic remedies to go through the same drug-approval process as standard medical treatments. Now the FDA is revisiting that decision. It will hold two days of hearings this week to decide whether homeopathic remedies should have to be proven safe and effective.

“So this will be the first dose,” he says. “Then I’ll give you a daily dose, to try to get underneath into your immune system to try to help you strengthen your energy, basically.”

Homeopathic medicine has long been controversial. It’s based on an idea known as “like cures like,” which means if you give somebody a dose of a substance — such as a plant or a mineral — that can cause the symptoms of their illness, it can, in theory, cure that illness if the substance has been diluted so much that it’s essentially no longer in the dose.

“We believe that there is a memory left in the solution. You might call it a memory. You might call it energy,” Aurigemma says. “Each substance in nature has a certain set of characteristics. And when a patient comes who matches the physical, mental and emotional symptoms that a remedy produces — that medicine may heal the person’s problem.”

Critics say those ideas are nonsense, and that study after study has failed to find any evidence that homeopathy works.

“Homeopathy is an excellent example of the purest form of pseudoscience,” says Steven Novella, a neurologist at Yale and executive editor of the website Science-Based Medicine. “These are principles that are not based upon science.”

Novella thinks consumers are wasting their money on homeopathic remedies. The cost of such treatments vary, with some over-the-counter products costing less than $10.

Some of the costs, such as visits to doctors and the therapies they prescribe, may be covered by insurance. But Novella says with so many people using homeopathic remedies, the costs add up.

There’s also some concern that homeopathic remedies could be dangerous if they’re contaminated or not completely diluted, or even if they simply don’t work.

Somebody who’s having an acute asthma attack, for example, who takes a homeopathic asthma remedy, “may very well die of their acute asthma attack because they were relying on a completely inert and ineffective treatment,” Novella says.

For years, critics like Novella have been asking the FDA to regulate homeopathy more aggressively. The FDA’s decision to revisit the issue now was motivated by several factors, including the growing popularity of homeopathic remedies and the length of time that has passed since the agency last considered the issue.

The FDA is also concerned about the quality of remedies, according to Cynthia Schnedar, director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Office of Compliance. The agency has issued a series of warnings about individual homeopathic products in recent years, including one that involved tablets being sold to alleviate teething pain in babies.

“So we thought it was time to take another look at our policy,” Schnedar says.

The FDA’s decision to examine the issue is making homeopathic practitioners like Aurigemma and their patients nervous. “It would be a terrible loss to this country if they were to do something drastic,” he says.

He also disputes claims that homeopathy doesn’t work and is unsafe.

“There’s no question that it helps patients. I have too many files on too many patients that have shown improvements,” Aurigemma says, although he acknowledges some homeopathic products sold over the counter make misleading claims.

Companies that make homeopathic remedies defend their products as well.

“Homeopathic medicines have a very long history of safety,” says Mark Land, vice president of operations and regulatory affairs for Boiron USA, which makes homeopathic products. “One of the hallmarks of homeopathic medicines is safety,” says Land, who is also president of the American Association of Homeopathic Pharmacists.

“The potential risk [of greater FDA regulation] to consumers is if any change in regulation were to limit access to these products,” says Land.

That’s what worries Resnick. She says homeopathic remedies have helped alleviate a long list of health problems she’s experienced over the years. “Why would they want to take that away from us?” she says. “Let us have the freedom to decide what works the best for us.”

The FDA says this week’s hearing is just a chance to start gathering information to decide what — if anything — the agency should do about homeopathy.

For full story see: http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/04/20/398806514/fda-ponders-whether-homeopathy-is-medicine

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add/adhd, adhd, hood river midwife, hood river naturopath, mental health, pediatrics

ADHD Not a Real Disease, Says Leading Neuroscientist

adhd

What do you think?

Alex Pietrowski, Waking Times One of the world’s leading pediatric neuroscientists, Dr. Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph.D, recently stated publicly that Attention Deficit/Hyper-Activity Disorder (ADHD) is not ‘a real disease,’ and warned of the dangers of giving psycho-stimulant medications to children.Speaking to the Observer, Dr. Perry noted that the disorder known as ADHD should be considered a description of a wide range of symptoms that many children and adults exhibit, most of which are factors that everyone of us displays at some point during our lives.

“It is best thought of as a description. If you look at how you end up with that label, it is remarkable because any one of us at any given time would fit at least a couple of those criteria,” he said.

Dr. Perry is a senior fellow of the ChildTrauma Academy in Houston, Texas, a highly respected member of the pediatric community, and author of several books on child psychology including, The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist’s Notebook–What Traumatized Children Can Teach Us About Loss, Love, and HealingandBorn for Love: Why Empathy Is Essential–and Endangered.

His comments are quite refreshing at a time when diagnoses for ADHD in the UK and the US are sky-rocketing and prescriptions of stimulant medications to children are also rising rapidly, with many parents and concerned activists growing suspicious of the pharmaceutical industry’s motivations in promoting drugs to children. Ritalin, Adderall, Vyvanse and other mind-altering stimulant medications are increasingly prescribed to children between the ages of 4 and 17.

Dr. Perry noted that the use of medications like these may be dangerous to the overall physical and mental development of the child, remarking on studies where these medications were given to animals and were proven detrimental to health.

“If you give psychostimulants to animals when they are young, their rewards systems change. They require much more stimulation to get the same level of pleasure.

“So on a very concrete level they need to eat more food to get the same sensation of satiation. They need to do more high-risk things to get that little buzz from doing something. It is not a benign phenomenon.

“Taking a medication influences systems in ways we don’t always understand. I tend to be pretty cautious about this stuff, particularly when the research shows you that other interventions are equally effective and over time more effective and have none of the adverse effects. For me it’s a no-brainer.”

Given that the problem of ADHD is complex and the term is more of a blanket term used to describe a wide range of behavioral symptoms, it is important to consider what the root causes of many of the symptoms may be before pharmaceutical intervention should be considered. Citing potential remedies, Dr. Perry suggested an approach that focuses attention on the parents and the child’s environment, while also recommending natural remedies like Yoga, and improved diet.

“There are number of non-pharmacological therapies which have been pretty effective. A lot of them involve helping the adults that are around children,” he said.

“Part of what happens is if you have an anxious, overwhelmed parent, that is contagious. When a child is struggling, the adults around them are easily disregulated too. This negative feedback process between the frustrated teacher or parent and dis-regulated child can escalate out of control.

“You can teach the adults how to regulate themselves, how to have realistic expectations of the children, how to give them opportunities that are achievable and have success and coach them through the process of helping children who are struggling.

“There are a lot of therapeutic approaches. Some would use somato-sensory therapies like yoga, some use motor activity like drumming.

“All have some efficacy. If you can put together a package of those things: keep the adults more mannered, give the children achievable goals, give them opportunities to regulate themselves, then you are going to minimise a huge percentage of the problems I have seen with children who have the problem labelled as ADHD.”

Many people may disagree with the assertion that ADD/ADHD should not be considered a disease, however, the fact remains that the myriad symptoms that are associated with these increasingly common ‘disorders’ can often be addressed and relieved without creating an addiction and dependency on pharmaceutical medications, which disrupt the mind and body in ways that are not fully understood or even researched.

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alternative medicine, homebirth, hood river midwife

New Report Urges Less Intervention in Births

I appreciate the message of this article, however it lacks a definition of post dates safety.  Questions we could be asking; what are more natural methods to support induction? Should we wait 43 weeks?  How often do we monitor placental health?  Birth is a complex journey and in our culture of unacknowledged emotions and mental states, it is no wonder we are resistant to surrender to the birth powers.  motherlode-childbirth-articleLargeBy KJ DELL’ANTONIA

A few weeks ago, Britain’s national health service advised healthy women that it was safer to have their babies at home, or in a birth center, than in a hospital. For low-risk mothers-to-be, giving birth in a traditional maternity ward increased the chances of surgical intervention.

new report from the Childbirth Connection; a program of the National Partnership for Women and Families, stops short of recommending home births in the United States, but does challenge the same issue addressed by Britain’s health service: Many hospitals approach childbirth from the premise that “more technology is better,” while significant research shows that less intervention is safer and healthier in most cases.

“If overtreatment is defined as instances in which an individual may have fared as well or better with less or perhaps no intervention,” the report states in its forward, “then modern obstetric care has landed in a deep quagmire. Navigating out of that territory will be challenging.”

Dr. Sarah Buckley, who collected and interpreted the research and wrote the report, suggests within it a number of ways of escaping that quagmire, all based on the premise that the hormonal physiology of childbirth nearly always works best when it is left to work at its own speed. The benefits of the natural process, her synthesis of the research suggests, go far beyond what we had previously understood; preparing mother and baby for birth through hormonal changes up to and during the labor and birth process.

Hospitals and clinicians should wait for labor to begin on its own, encourage and support women laboring at home during early labor, and have patience with women in labor in their facilities rather than using interventions to speed up the process. Women, too, should be patient, trust their bodies to work through the process and “stay calm and relaxed” (frustrating advice for many women, but advice that might be more easily heard and heeded in an atmosphere less stressful than that of many maternity wards).

“It’s important for both clinicians and women to understand that common interventions, that we have come to view quite casually, are actually quite consequential,” said Carol Sakala, director of Childbirth Connection Programs at the National Partnership for Women & Families.

“Our current high rates of intervention are not serving women well,” she said. “But the community is really moving in the right direction. Professional societies are breaking with the past,” and talking publicly about the overuse of cesarean sections, the need to avoid constant fetal monitoring, and not permitting elective inductions or cesareans. “We are hopeful that the timing of this report will support that change.”

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birth, hood river midwife, pregnancy

10 Things I Wish All Women Knew About Giving Birth

Love this article by Aviva Romm in Pathways Magazine.  She hits on many points that are so true about labor, but can also be linked to our everyday life.
art-of-birth-baby

When I was pregnant, I seemed to be a magnet for birth war stories—cords around the neck, emergency cesareans, and more.
It took a lot of inner conviction to believe in birth as a natural, beautiful event that my body was capable of, rather than a “disaster waiting to happen,” as one obstetrician warned me it was.

But inner conviction I decided to have, and my four children were born at home, peacefully, without drama or trauma. I made sure I was in awesome health throughout my pregnancies, eating an organic, plant-based diet. I did yoga daily, spent time in nature, and meditated on the type of birth I wanted to have.

And then I surrendered to the forces of nature. The power I experienced as a woman has given me confidence in so many areas of my life, and I so wish this for other women.

Sadly, however, natural birth is becoming endangered. About one in three women in the United States will have their babies by cesarean section. Maybe that sounds like no big deal—but actually, cesareans are major abdominal surgery that increases your risk of complications over natural birth.

Cesareans are grossly overdone in U.S. hospitals. And they often make recovery and breastfeeding much more challenging. They expose your baby to an antibiotic (all moms having a cesarean are given antibiotics at the time of surgery) before she or he is even born. And most of the ones that are performed turn out to be unnecessary.

Also, many more women will have their labor induced or experience some form of obstetric intervention. The downturn in natural birth is so significant that a group of researchers wanting to study the natural course of labor couldn’t find a large enough group of women birthing naturally in any one place to study them!

But we can’t let natural birth go extinct, because it’s way more than just a romantic ideal. Babies born vaginally (and without medication) have many health advantages. For example, just being exposed to mom’s flora on the way out of the birth canal decreases the lifetime likelihood of developing digestive problems, allergies, and even obesity.

While we can’t fully control what happens in our births, and of course, sometimes interventions are necessary (though often they aren’t!), you can embrace core beliefs that will increase your chances of having the birth experience that is healthiest for you and baby.

Here are the 10 most important philosophies that helped me have my babies naturally, which I’ve used to support thousands of women in their birthing experiences. My hope is that these can help you have an optimal birthing experience…maybe even the birth of your dreams!

Though a spiritual journey, birth is not all incense and candles. It asks us to call upon our primal instincts and sometimes even to get primal—making animal sounds, assuming poses that have us buck naked on our hands and knees, moving our hips in deep sultry belly-dancing undulations.

Planning to take a deep dive into your subconscious and intuition to let your primal self emerge can allow you to open and birth your baby with a raw strength and power you might not even realize lives within you.

1 Birth is a spiritual journey; it’s also primal.  Birth is, to say the least, a physically and emotionally demanding experience. Approaching the challenge as a spiritual journey can help you dig deep into your core for the resources to persevere, and to learn about yourself and your innate strength and power.

Birth should not be taken lying down.  Lying down simply doesn’t let gravity do the work of helping your baby come down and out! Walking, moving your hips like a belly dancer, and generally staying active facilitates a more physiologic process for your baby than lying on your back in a hospital bed, which increases your chances of a cesarean.

3 Contractions are amazing sensations that get your baby born. During my own births, I used my imagination and awareness to dive deep into the sensation of my muscles working to help my baby get born. This focused aware- ness transformed my perception of the pain of birth into the power of birth.

I even used the term “expansions,” rather than “contractions,” to help me think about the sensation in a new way. It did not make the experience less intense, but it made the sensation my ally rather than my enemy. As I welcomed each new wave of labor, I knew I was closer to bringing my baby into my arms.

4 Fear stops labor.
Mammalian mamas have powerful instincts that allow us to keep our babies safe from harm. For

example, mama giraffes on the tundra will spontaneously stop labor if they sense a predator in the area, rather than dropping a helpless newborn to the ground. We too, have hormones that can stimulate labor (oxytocin) and those can stop labor if pumped out early because of fear (adrenaline).

So learning to transform fear into power and confi- dence is essential for a smooth birth. How is this done? Make sure you feel safe where you are birthing, that you have good support in labor, and that you have talked with your birth provider about any fears you are harbor- ing or repressing about your health and safety, your baby’s health and safety, or the birthing process. Being educated and informed can help you to dispel fears.

5 Question authority! (Remember, nice girls can ask questions and say no.) Obstetrics practices are not always based on

the best science. The September 2011 issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the official publication of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), reported that only one-third of all obstetrics guide- lines in the U.S. are based on good scientific evidence. Another third are based on limited or inconsistent evidence, and the remaining third are based on expert opinion, which is “subject to bias, either implicit or subconscious.”

So just because a doctor (or midwife) tells you something is required (lying down in labor, having a vaginal exam, wearing an external fetal monitor for your entire labor, having an IV drip routinely), doesn’t mean you have do it unquestioningly—
or at all. As girls and young women, many of us learn not to question authority—we’re encouraged to just be a “good girl,” and not be the geek who asks questions. Many of the procedures done in hospitals are done “just because”—they are routine, but often not necessary.

So if something is recommended or expected that makes you uncomfortable or you’re not sure of the reason, ask! And if you’re not comfortable with the explanation, you can decline. Having an advocate there who can help you sort through decisions, especially when you are otherwise occupied doing the work of labor, is especially valuable.

6 Women should eat and drink during labor. Current scientific evidence has demonstrated that women who eat and drink in labor are not at significantly increased risk of food aspiration in the event of a cesarean, which has been the much-feared reason for keeping women on an ice-chips and fruit-pops-only regimen in labor for the past few decades.

In fact, keeping up your energy with light and nourishing fare has been found, by many midwives and mamas, to facilitate labor and reduce the likelihood of labor petering out, or needing Pitocin or a cesarean.

Your body is a marvelous, perfectly crafted force of nature.  Believing in yourself is powerful medicine!

Yet most of us go into labor believing our bodies might be lemons—the reject in the batch that just doesn’t work properly and needs to be sent back to the factory on a recall.

The reality is, nature is amazing at creating power- ful systems that work. Setting intentions and learning to have confidence in the birthing process—and your body—are among the most powerful tools you can use to go with the natural flow of labor and birth and gain some self-enlightenment in the process.

8.  Obstetrics is big business.
There is a whole system of medicine out there, called obstetrics, making a fortune off of your body! In fact, there is enormous financial incentive for obstetricians to do ultrasounds (in my community, a doctor’s office charges the insurance company $700 per ultrasound), offer endless tests, and perform cesareans rather than support natural, vaginal births.

Want to avoid unnecessary medical interventions? Then make your body your business by getting educated. Read about birth. Some good places to start: Ina May Gaskin’s Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth, Henci Goer’s The Thinking Woman’s Guide to a Better Birth, and my book, The Natural Pregnancy Book.

Birth is something you do, not something that is done to you.
Whether you dance, groan, or Hypnobirth your way through labor, it ain’t called labor for nothing. It takes work, focus, and sweat to get a baby out. Powerful muscles move a 6- to 8-pound being (on average) a short distance through a relatively small space. This means effort is required.

Just as with any hard task, being realistic about what’s involved, setting your mind and heart to it by getting psyched ahead of time, and then having strate- gies to call upon when your energy or determination wavers will get you to the other side of the finish line with power and pride.

10 Birth can be ecstatic.
While there might be some huffing and puffing, grunting and groaning, and even a holler or two if you need to vocalize the intense energy moving through you as you bring your baby out into the world, birth can be an ecstatic experience, particularly when you appreciate yourself for the accomplishment of a hard job done with determination and experience the ecstasy of holding your new baby in your arms.

As you get closer to your baby’s birth, and even in labor, here’s a simple mantra to tell yourself:
I’ve got this!

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